Teal Pumpkin Project offers safe Halloween for children with allergies

This Halloween, teal pumpkins will signal safe treats for trick-or-treaters with food allergies as part of the Teal Pumpkin Project, an awareness initiative jointly supported this year by leading food allergy organizations.

Over the past four years, households from every state have participated in the Teal Pumpkin Project, which encourages people to place a teal pumpkin in front of their home to show they have non-food treats available for children with food allergies and medically-necessary dietary restrictions.

“The number of children with food allergies as well as the number of anaphylactic reactions to food have risen dramatically over the last 20 years, and the prevalence of other diseases that cause adverse reactions to food continues to grow, as well,” said FARE CEO Lisa Gable. “Participating in the Teal Pumpkin Project has a collective impact, bringing people together to provide a more inclusive trick-or-treating experience for all. We are excited to join forces with other food allergy organizations who share our commitment to keeping children with food allergies safe and included and hope to see a teal pumpkin on every block in America.”

Virtually any food can cause a reaction. Many popular Halloween candies contain nuts, milk, egg, soy or wheat, which are among the most common allergens. Additionally, many miniature candy items do not have labels, so it is difficult to determine whether these items are safe.

Taking part in the Teal Pumpkin Project is simple: paint a pumpkin teal, or buy one at any number of national retailers, and place it on front of your home to show you have non-food treats. Participants can offer treats, such as glow sticks or small toys, as an alternative to candy.

The Teal Pumpkin Project was inspired by a local awareness activity by the Food Allergy Community of East Tennessee.

To learn more and add a participating home to Teal Pumpkin Project map, visit www.tealpumpkinproject.org.

Epinephrine Nasal Spray for Anaphylaxis Gets Fast Tracked by FDA

INSYS Therapeutics, Inc has announced that the (FDA) has granted Fast Track designation to the company’s epinephrine nasal spray as an investigational treatment for anaphylaxis, an acute, life-threatening allergic reaction requiring urgent treatment.

The Company say that preliminary data (n=60) of patients with seasonal allergies showed rapid absorption of intranasal epinephrine.The bioavailability of the novel epinephrine nasal spray also proved similar to that of intramuscular injection with EpiPen 0.3mg injection.

“This is an exciting milestone for people affected by severe allergies who might be seeking an alternative delivery mechanism for epinephrine,” said Saeed Motahari, president and chief executive officer of INSYS Therapeutics.

U.K. Study – many parents admit to banning children’s friends if they have allergies

Children with food allergies are not being invited to parties and social events because their friends’ parents are terrified of killing or hurting them, new research suggests.

Supermarket Asda, which quizzed 2,000 adults for the survey and found 54 per cent of parents admit to banning youngsters with wheat or nut allergies from after-school events or celebrations.

Of those who are invited, 68% have gone hungry due to their friends’ parents finding it too difficult to cater for their needs, the research adds.

70% of affected youngsters have felt excluded and 68% have gone hungry at the event.
About 5 to 8% of children have a food allergy, with 58% of these having suffered a reaction and 60% being hospitalized as a result. But 47% do not know what caused their reaction and 26% are too shy to reveal they have special dietary requirements.

Jo Johnson, from Asda, said: “Armed with the right help and advice, all households can become an inclusive environment.”

Food Allergy Market is on the Rise

The global food allergy market is expected to grow at an approximate CAGR of 6.6% during the forecast period of 2018-2023.

The Americas holds the largest share of the global food allergy market owing to the increasing prevalence of food allergy, the presence of a well-developed healthcare sector, and huge health care expenditures within the region.

Europe stands second in the market due to the availability of funds for research followed by a huge patient population and strict food regulation standards. On a regional basis, Europe is segmented into Western Europe and Eastern Europe. Western Europe leads the regional food allergy market while Eastern Europe is estimated to be the fastest growing region.

Asia Pacific stands third in the global food allergy market and is projected to be the fastest growing region. The presence of developing economies, rising patient population, and increasing government efforts for a labeling-compliance drive the market within the region.

The Middle East and Africa holds the least share in the global food allergy market owing to the presence of weak economies, lack of awareness, and poor availability of healthcare services, especially within the African region.

Celebrities have food allergies too

Sharing stories of celebrities and athletes who have to live with and manage their food allergies every day helps food allergic children relate to the world by reiterating the message that they are not alone and having allergies doesn’t mean you can’t live the life you want.

Here is a list of celebrities with various food allergies;

Ariana Grande is one of many celebs with shellfish allergies she is also allergic to bananas.
Kelly Clarkson is allergic to peanuts. In addition to her food allergy, Clarkson is also allergic to dog hair and goldenrod.
Actor and comedian Steve Martin is allergic to shellfish.
Actor and comedian Ray Romano is allergic to peanuts.
Movie star Drew Barrymore lives with her coffee and garlic allergies and says it “can be a major pain”.
Actress Zooey Deschanel is allergic to eggs, dairy and wheat.
Movie Star Halle Berry is reportedly another star with a shellfish allergy.
Jessica Simpsonis allergic to tomatoes, wheat, and milk.
Former U.S. President Bill Clinton is allergic to chocolate and flour.

Food Allergy Parents:

Sarah Jessica Parker & Matthew Broderick (son allergic to peanuts)
Gwyneth Paltrow & Chris Martin (son allergic to gluten and daughter allergic dairy)

Medical Engineers Have Built A EpiPen Replacement That Costs $16 (USD) A Shot

A South African team has created the ZiBiPen, which delivers a shot of adrenaline from a replaceable, $16 (USD) cartridge.

The reusable pen costs $80 and is intended to last five years.

The standard for treating anaphylaxis, the EpiPen, is single use, must be replaced regularly, and is expensive.

A team of South African biomedical engineers have built a cheap replacement for the EpiPen that could revolutionize the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction that can be triggered by food or insect bites.

Called the ZiBiPen, it delivers a shot of adrenaline in the form of a replaceable, $16 cartridge.

“The cost of the pen is $80 (USD) and we are testing to make it last up to five years,” said Gokul Nair, who helped develop it alongside fellow University of Cape Town’s Medical Devices Lab alumnus Giancarlo Beukes.

That is a fraction of the cost of the dominant device on the market, the EpiPen, which sells for $600 (USD) in a pack of 2; lasts only up to 18 months; and can only be used once.

“When we originally did research into the cost of the devices on the market, we found that delays in the distribution chain can mean South Africans only receive their devices with six months before expiry, which made it unaffordable for South Africans,” said Nair, who originally designed it for a master’s project at the Division of Asthma and Allergy at the Red Cross Children’s Hospital.

The rising cost of the EpiPen has seen a class action lawsuit against manufacturer Mylan. The lawsuit claims the company is engaged in an illegal scheme to dramatically increase the list price, which ten years ago was $88, reported CNBC.

Adrenaline auto-injectors are inserted in the thigh, through the clothes. The shot slows the allergic reaction, buying precious time to get users to a hospital.

Australia Puts A ‘Teal’ Spotlight On Food Allergy Awareness – Sydney, Brisbane and Perth set to shine next week for food allergy awareness week.

In support of Food Allergy Awareness Week (13-19 May, 2018) three Australian cities will light up in teal –the colour associated with food allergy awareness.

The iconic Sydney Town Hall, which last year became the first building outside of North America to join the ‘Turn it Teal’ initiative, will once again light up on Friday May 18, 2018.

The City of Brisbane joins the ‘Turn It Teal’ movement and will light up both the Story Bridge and Victoria Bridge on Wednesday the 16th of May 2018.

The City of Perth, Western Australia will put the spotlight on food allergy awareness by lighting the Trafalgar Bridge in teal Wednesday 16th and 17th of May.

‘Turn it Teal’ was started by a U.S.A mother, Stephanie Lowe with the goal of lighting as many prominent monuments and buildings as possible to highlight Food Allergy Awareness Week.TRIGGER Food Allergy Awareness has joined the initiative to ‘Turn it Teal’in Australia and beyond.
“This is such a great idea to raise food allergy awareness and I’m so proud of Sydney, Brisbane and Perth and we have other Australian cities indicating they’ll be on board next year” TRIGGER founder Grace Farah stated.
‘People see a building or a bridge lit, it starts a conversation but it also shows our Australian children and families dealing with food allergies that Sydney, Brisbane, Perth and Australia cares.’
‘We want to express our heartfelt thanks to all the great folks at Sydney, Brisbane and Perth councils who have made this happen’.

This May ‘Turn It Teal’ will see many buildings lit up including the Empire State Building in New York, JFK Airport Air Traffic Control Tower, Seattle’s Pacific Science Center and Niagara Falls in the Buffalo/Toronto area.

For more information about how you can help your local area ‘Turn It Teal’ visit turnitteal.org or email us at info@triggerawareness.org
Please also help us raise awareness by watching and sharing this video.
https://vimeo.com/264526837

Thank You.

Family Pushes For Epinephrine Auto Injectors On Planes After Mid-Flight Allergy Attack

A family vacation turned into an emergency on the way home when 10-year-old Long Island boy Luca Ingrassi suffered a severe allergic reaction mid-flight.

Luca had no idea he was allergic to tree nuts when he and his family boarded the plane, but 15 minutes after consuming a single cashew, Luca started complaining of stomach and chest pain, and a tickling sensation in his throat. Luca was experiencing anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction.

Thanks to quick-thinking passengers and staff on the American Airlines plane, Luca survived.

Now his mother, Francine, is calling for change and has started a petition to make all airlines have two pack Epinephrine Auto Injectors on all flights made available to all passengers who have allergies, and for those who are unaware they have an allergy like Luca.

Here is the link to the petition https://chn.ge/2EGBNqH

Turn The World Teal This May

May is Food Allergy Awareness Month, a great time to spread the word about food allergies. Understanding food allergies and identifying allergic reactions can and does help save lives.

This year, we have teamed up once again with turnitteal.org to turn the world teal, the signature color of food allergy awareness.

‘Turn it Teal’, founded by Cleveland, Ohio native Stephanie Lowe in 2014, was created with the goal of lighting as many prominent monuments and buildings as possible
to highlight Food Allergy Awareness Week, (May 13 -19) an initiative intended to educate the public regarding the seriousness of food allergies.

The lighting of the Sydney Town Hall last year made history, being the first building outside of North America to turn teal in support of food allergy awareness.

TRIGGER Food Allergy Awareness founder, Grace Farah said: “It was so exciting to see the stunning Sydney Town Hall lit in Teal. It’s a great initiative –
people see the building lit and it starts a conversation, but it also shows Australian kids and families dealing with food allergies that Sydney cares and Australia cares. This year, the hope is to see as many other countries, cities and towns come on board and turn their buildings teal and show their support.”

“How great would it be to not only see Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, W.A, Tasmania and the Territory ‘Turn it Teal’, but also New Zealand, London, Paris, Italy, China, India, the UK, Europe and Asia?”

For more information about how you can help your local area ‘Turn It Teal’ visit turnitteal.org or email us at info@triggerawareness.org

Please also help us raise awareness by watching and sharing this video. Thank You.

https://vimeo.com/264526837

Survey of school nurses reveals significant progress in schools, but more needs to be done

Nearly all school nurses participating in an American national survey (96 percent) reported that staff at their school received training on handling severe allergic reactions to food. Over 80 percent asserted that their school had an emergency epinephrine auto-injector on hand to stop a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction.

The study findings, published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, also underscore the dire need for these policies, with over one-third of the school nurses reporting at least one severe allergic reaction to food at their school in the last academic year.

“We were encouraged to see high rates of epinephrine availability in schools,” says senior author Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, who also is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “This is significant improvement over the last decade. We also saw that epinephrine was available more often when schools had full-time nurses. Greater nurse presence appears to be an important factor in implementing food allergy policies in schools.

The nurses in the current survey pointed to some areas in need of improvement;
Their responses indicated the least implemented policies: labeling of school lunch items with allergen information; specific food policies for after-school activities; and not having emergency epinephrine with students on field trips or other activities away from school.

Given these survey results, “we need to continue working together with families and schools to develop feasible policies that protect children with food allergies.”

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