Australia Puts A ‘Teal’ Spotlight On Food Allergy Awareness – Sydney, Brisbane and Perth set to shine next week for food allergy awareness week.

In support of Food Allergy Awareness Week (13-19 May, 2018) three Australian cities will light up in teal –the colour associated with food allergy awareness.

The iconic Sydney Town Hall, which last year became the first building outside of North America to join the ‘Turn it Teal’ initiative, will once again light up on Friday May 18, 2018.

The City of Brisbane joins the ‘Turn It Teal’ movement and will light up both the Story Bridge and Victoria Bridge on Wednesday the 16th of May 2018.

The City of Perth, Western Australia will put the spotlight on food allergy awareness by lighting the Trafalgar Bridge in teal Wednesday 16th and 17th of May.

‘Turn it Teal’ was started by a U.S.A mother, Stephanie Lowe with the goal of lighting as many prominent monuments and buildings as possible to highlight Food Allergy Awareness Week.TRIGGER Food Allergy Awareness has joined the initiative to ‘Turn it Teal’in Australia and beyond.
“This is such a great idea to raise food allergy awareness and I’m so proud of Sydney, Brisbane and Perth and we have other Australian cities indicating they’ll be on board next year” TRIGGER founder Grace Farah stated.
‘People see a building or a bridge lit, it starts a conversation but it also shows our Australian children and families dealing with food allergies that Sydney, Brisbane, Perth and Australia cares.’
‘We want to express our heartfelt thanks to all the great folks at Sydney, Brisbane and Perth councils who have made this happen’.

This May ‘Turn It Teal’ will see many buildings lit up including the Empire State Building in New York, JFK Airport Air Traffic Control Tower, Seattle’s Pacific Science Center and Niagara Falls in the Buffalo/Toronto area.

For more information about how you can help your local area ‘Turn It Teal’ visit turnitteal.org or email us at info@triggerawareness.org
Please also help us raise awareness by watching and sharing this video.
https://vimeo.com/264526837

Thank You.

Turn The World Teal This May

May is Food Allergy Awareness Month, a great time to spread the word about food allergies. Understanding food allergies and identifying allergic reactions can and does help save lives.

This year, we have teamed up once again with turnitteal.org to turn the world teal, the signature color of food allergy awareness.

‘Turn it Teal’, founded by Cleveland, Ohio native Stephanie Lowe in 2014, was created with the goal of lighting as many prominent monuments and buildings as possible
to highlight Food Allergy Awareness Week, (May 13 -19) an initiative intended to educate the public regarding the seriousness of food allergies.

The lighting of the Sydney Town Hall last year made history, being the first building outside of North America to turn teal in support of food allergy awareness.

TRIGGER Food Allergy Awareness founder, Grace Farah said: “It was so exciting to see the stunning Sydney Town Hall lit in Teal. It’s a great initiative –
people see the building lit and it starts a conversation, but it also shows Australian kids and families dealing with food allergies that Sydney cares and Australia cares. This year, the hope is to see as many other countries, cities and towns come on board and turn their buildings teal and show their support.”

“How great would it be to not only see Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, W.A, Tasmania and the Territory ‘Turn it Teal’, but also New Zealand, London, Paris, Italy, China, India, the UK, Europe and Asia?”

For more information about how you can help your local area ‘Turn It Teal’ visit turnitteal.org or email us at info@triggerawareness.org

Please also help us raise awareness by watching and sharing this video. Thank You.

https://vimeo.com/264526837

Survey of school nurses reveals significant progress in schools, but more needs to be done

Nearly all school nurses participating in an American national survey (96 percent) reported that staff at their school received training on handling severe allergic reactions to food. Over 80 percent asserted that their school had an emergency epinephrine auto-injector on hand to stop a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction.

The study findings, published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, also underscore the dire need for these policies, with over one-third of the school nurses reporting at least one severe allergic reaction to food at their school in the last academic year.

“We were encouraged to see high rates of epinephrine availability in schools,” says senior author Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, who also is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “This is significant improvement over the last decade. We also saw that epinephrine was available more often when schools had full-time nurses. Greater nurse presence appears to be an important factor in implementing food allergy policies in schools.

The nurses in the current survey pointed to some areas in need of improvement;
Their responses indicated the least implemented policies: labeling of school lunch items with allergen information; specific food policies for after-school activities; and not having emergency epinephrine with students on field trips or other activities away from school.

Given these survey results, “we need to continue working together with families and schools to develop feasible policies that protect children with food allergies.”

Kids Allergic To Cow’s Milk May Have Lower Weight, Height

Children who are allergic to milk are shorter and lighter compared to kids who are allergic to tree nuts or peanuts, according to a study that confirms childhood food allergies can affect growth. The study was conducted by the Children’s National Health System, presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology/World Allergy Organization.

The study of two groups of children, one strictly avoiding cow’s milk and the other avoiding peanuts and tree nuts because of clinically diagnosed allergy.

In measurements from a chart review of 1,098 clinic visits, they found that children with a milk allergy tended to have a lower weight and height, but not body mass index (BMI), compared to the peanut and tree nut allergic children.

The largest differences in weight were recorded when the children were 5 to 8 years-old and 9 to 12 years-old. Other allergic conditions, including eczema, and use of inhaled corticosteroids did not seem to effect weight.

“Correspondingly, persistent milk allergy was associated with a greater decline in weight and also BMI from the baseline visit when the children were 2 to 4 years-old,” said author Corinne Keet, MD, MS, PhD. “From our findings, this negative trend in growth appears to continue through pre-adolescence.”

Keet went on to note that the differences in weight, height and BMI are persistent and more pronounced for the patients with measurements at age 13 and above.

“Further study is needed to better understand the complex relationship between food allergy and childhood growth patterns,” said Keet. “Pediatricians and allergists need to work with their patients to ensure a diet that promotes healthy growth while acknowledging nutritional limitations due to allergy.”

‘Peter Rabbit’ Team Apologizes for Making Light of Allergies

“Peter Rabbit” filmmakers and the studio behind it are apologizing for insensitively depicting a character’s allergy in the film that has prompted global backlash.
Sony Pictures says in a statement the film “should not have made light” of a character being allergic to blackberries “even in a cartoonish” way.
In “Peter Rabbit” which was released this weekend, the character of Mr. McGregor is allergic to blackberries. The rabbits fling the fruit at him in a scene and he is forced to use an EpiPen.
Charity groups posted warnings about the scene on social media prompting the hashtag #boycottpeterrabbit to trend.
The studio and filmmakers say they regret not being more aware and sensitive to the issue.

Tips For Traveling With Food Allergies

One of the most difficult challenges related to food allergies is dealing with them while you travel. Let’s face it, part of enjoying life is taking a holiday now and then, but doing so with a child with food allergies requires some planning and preparation.

Here are a few tips we found;

Start planning early and research your intended desination.

Bring several copies of your action plan with you and if possible have them translated into your destination country’s language.

Research the food policies of various airlines.

Locate the hospital nearest to where you will be staying, just in case.

Pack extra medication in your carry on bag and bring non-perishable foods your child can eat.

Clean your child’s hands regularly on the flight and during the trip;

Pack a stack of reading books, crayons and paper (to keep them occupied:)

Remember, a holiday is supposed to be fun for everyone and as ‘worry free’ as you can make it. With solid preparation and planning it can be done!

Tis the season to celebrate and be safe

The Holiday season can be a challenging time for food allergy sufferers and their families, but with some careful planning, communication and vigilance, food allergies are manageable and the festive season can be enjoyed.

One key to a successful celebration is communication; communicating with your guests who may be coming for dinner and bringing dishes, is just one example; suggest dishes they can bring or alternatives instead of bringing food – ask them to bring flowers instead, etc.

Communicate ahead of time with hosts who have invited you to their event ensuring they are fully aware of the allergies involved and what is required to keep loved ones safe. Never assume that just because they know you have an allergy that they know what to do.

Remaining vigilant is also key- ensure you have your medication at all times and that the medication is up to date. Make sure you have an action plan and know what to do should a medical emergency occur.

Follow the rule; ‘If in doubt leave it out.’ If you are unsure of the ingredients of a particular dish its best to err on the side of caution- simply don’t risk it. Many food allergic people opt to take their own food to events to avoid cross contamination or confusion.

Finally, make sure you take the time to thank your guests or hosts for their efforts to make the event allergy friendly. Though people are aware of the existence of food allergies, many people are simply not cognizant of how truly dangerous they can be and if they care enough about you and your loved ones to be patient and make adjustments to their plans, always take the time to let them know how much you appreciate it.

Happy Holidays!

The Need For A Balanced Diet When You Have Food Allergies

The first duty in preparing safe meals for children with food allergies is avoiding the offending ingredient or allergen(s). However, by avoiding these ingredients, a real risk exists that food allergy sufferers may be missing out on important nutrients that help maintain good health and stronger immune systems.

A balanced diet is essential. Discovering what important nutrients may be missing from your child’s diet as a result of the allergy and replacing it with an alternate source is recommended. Just one example of finding alternatives to ensure proper vitamin and nutrient absorption is the following; if the allergen is milk- which is rich in protein, calcium, Riboflavin, phosphorus, vitamins A, D, B12, which are essential for bone mineralization and growth. You can replace milk with meat, fish, poultry, legumes, eggs (fortified milk substitutes), leafy greens and other calcium-fortified foods.

Of course, you should only use these replacements if they are also safe for your child and if you are not sure, have your child tested. Each sufferer is different and discussing your nutritional needs with your allergist, family physician and/or nutrition expert is imperative.

Teal Pumpkin Project offers safe Halloween for children with allergies

For children with food allergies, Halloween can be a tricky holiday, but the Teal Pumpkin Project aims to make the holiday safer and easier to navigate.

For millions of children with food allergies and their parents, the Halloween trick-or-treating tradition can sometimes be fraught with anxiety because many candies that are handed out contain major food allergens such as milk, peanuts, tree nuts and wheat.

FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project promotes safety and inclusion for all trick-or-treaters by encouraging people to provide non-food treats on Halloween. A pumpkin painted teal, the color for food allergy awareness, signals that children will find a fun, non-food treat that anyone can enjoy.

Join FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project to help create a safer, happier Halloween for all.

Visit these websites:
www.tealpumpkinproject.org
www.foodallergy.org

STUDY: Life Saving Epinephrine Isn’t Administered Often Enough

Less than fifty percent of children who experience anaphylaxis receive epinephrine before treatment in an Emergency Department, despite the medication being the first line of defence against the condition.

According to a study published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, when youths experience serious allergy attacks, known as anaphylaxis – parents, teachers, caregivers, emergency responders and others often don’t administer epinephrine.

The research found that only 36 percent of patients experiencing anaphylaxis received epinephrine before arriving at the emergency department. There is a need for more education, showing caregivers “how to use the auto injectors and walking them through what signs to look for,” said Melissa Robinson, an allergist and lead author of the study.

Approximately 65 percent of the patients surveyed had a known history of anaphylaxis and half of this group had been prescribed epinephrine in the past. However, among the patients who had been prescribed epinephrine, only 70 percent had the medication with them at the time of the allergy attack.

Robinson and her team also noted that there was a major difference between the patients who arrived at the emergency room after being given epinephrine and those who hadn’t. Children whose caregivers had administered an EpiPen were 60 percent more likely to be discharged from the hospital rather than admitted.

Robinson speculates that a major part of the problem is that parents and caregivers often don’t recognize recognise symptoms of anaphylaxis quickly enough (or at all). Some of the most common symptoms include hives, trouble breathing, and vomiting, all which occur within two hours of being exposed to an allergen. She suggests administering epinephrine when two body symptoms react to the allergen (for example, hives and vomiting indicate that both the stomach and skin have been affected).

“If you’re not sure to the point where you’re thinking about it, I tell parents it’s better to give it than to wait,” Robinson said.

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